Tribal FlagsThe Lewis and Clark Expedition crossed the lands of many American Indian tribes. Shown below are 65 flags representing those tribes. Click here to see the list.
Click on a flag to see an enlargement and the tribe’s name and location today. Descriptions and the history of each flag is provided, if available.
Note: Video content on this site does not necessarily correspond to the tribes whose flags are shown here. See Site Map for more information.

  • Small flag of Absentee Shawnee Tribe
    Flag of Absentee Shawnee Tribe

    Absentee Shawnee Tribe, Shawnee, Oklahoma

  • Small flag of Blackfeet Nation
    Flag of Blackfeet Nation

    Blackfeet Nation, Browning, Montana

    History of the Blackfeet Flag

    The Blackfeet Flag was born in 1980. The Blackfeet Media Department sponsored a contest for the design. A panel of judges consisting of artists, elders, and community members chose the design you see today. Numerous entries were submitted however, Lawrence Tailfeathers and Pattijo W. ComesAtNight did the winning entry.

    Description: The design is black and white on blue sky. A multitude of single eagle feathers create a circle. Inside the circle is the current land base of the Blackfeet Nation. (This war bonnet was to be changed to the uniquely Blackfeet Straight up War Bonnet, however, Mr. Tailfeathers passed away before changing the drawing). To the left of the circle of feathers stands the traditional flag of our people, the Eagle Feather staff. (Pattijo did the drawing of this staff). Colors and design represent the Earth, the cosmos, the elements, the plants and the animal as well as the people.

    Circle: Represents the cycle of life, people are connected, always were, always will be, the circle never ends. The many feathers equate the many bands of the proud and numerous Blackfeet arranged in a circle, beginning in a clockwise direction, as life is. The sun rises in the East, circles to the West, the moon rises and sets in this circular motion, as is the cosmos. Blackfeet people pitch the lodges with the doors to the East, knowing that we start life with the circle in mind, it is perpetual.

    Feathers: Represent the majestic and mysticism of the Eagle. Eagle feathers represent long life, energy, power, accomplishment or coup. The way the eagle feathers are arranged on the side traditional staff represent the buffalo boss ribs. Buffalo is the staff of life to the Blackfeet.

    Source: History of the Blackfeet Flag

  • Small flag of Blood
    Flag of Blood

    Blood, Standoff, Alberta, Canada

  • Small flag of Chehalis Tribe
    Flag of Chehalis Tribe

    Chehalis Tribe, Oakville, Washington

  • Small flag of Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe
    Flag of Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe

    Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, Eagle Butte, South Dakota

  • Small flag of Cheyenne-Arapahoe Tribes
    Flag of Cheyenne-Arapahoe Tribes

    Cheyenne-Arapahoe Tribes, Concho, Oklahoma

  • Small flag of Chinook Indian Tribe
    Flag of Chinook Indian Tribe

    Chinook Indian Tribe, Chinook, Washington

  • Small flag of Chippewa Cree Tribe
    Flag of Chippewa Cree Tribe

    Chippewa Cree Tribe, Box Elder, Montana

  • Small flag of Clatsop-Nehalem Confederated Tribes
    Flag of Clatsop-Nehalem Confederated Tribes

    Clatsop-Nehalem Confederated Tribes, Turner, Oregon

  • Small flag of Coeur D'Alene Tribe
    Flag of Coeur D'Alene Tribe

    Coeur D'Alene Tribe, Plummer, Idaho

  • Small flag of Comanche Tribe
    Flag of Comanche Tribe

    Comanche Tribe, Lawton, Oklahoma

  • Small flag of Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes
    Flag of Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

    Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Pablo, Montana

  • Small flag of Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde
    Flag of Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde

    Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, Grande Ronde, Oregon

  • Small flag of Confederated Tribes of Umatilla Indian Reservation
    Flag of Confederated Tribes of Umatilla Indian Reservation

    Confederated Tribes of Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, Oregon

  • Small flag of Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs
    Flag of Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs

    Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Warm Springs, Oregon

  • Small flag of Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation
    Flag of Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation

    Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Nespelem, Washington

  • Small flag of Cowlitz Indian Tribe
    Flag of Cowlitz Indian Tribe

    Cowlitz Indian Tribe, Longview, Washington

    A tribal member did the art. The mountain is the volcano Mt. St. Helens. We called it Loo Wit Loowa, the fire lady.

    Source: Mike Iyall

  • Small flag of Crow Creek Sioux Tribe
    Flag of Crow Creek Sioux Tribe

    Crow Creek Sioux Tribe, Ft. Thompson, South Dakota

  • Small flag of Crow Nation
    Flag of Crow Nation

    Crow Nation, Crow Agency, Montana

    As it is the way of the Apsáalooke, the Crow Tribal Emblem and Flag have deep meaning and history. In 1967, during the Edison Real Bird Administration the Crow Cultural Commission, chaired by Henry Old Coyote, began a plan to design the Crow Tribal emblem and flag. Lloyd Mickey Old Coyote voluntarily assumed the responsibility and task of compiling the information and developing a plan on the design of the Crow Tribal Emblem and Flag. Mickey presented the plan along with the graphic illustration designed by Lawrence Big Hair to the Cultural Committee for approval. From here, the emblem and the flag came to reality.

    The Flag is trimmed in gold. This is because the Seven Sacred Rams revealed spiritually powerful knowledge to a young boy. He was named by the Sacred Rams' Chief after himself. His name was Big Metal. The Seven Rams, whose horns and hooves were shining with gold, named the Big Horn Mountains and the Big Big Horn and Little Big Horn Rivers. They instructed the Apsáalooke never to change those names and the Apsáalooke would always remain as a people and prosper.

    The Flag background is blue. The belief it represents states when the sky and the waters are clear everything between them is good and peaceful.

    The Emblem on the Flag is encircled. This represents the Path of All Things. This Path is clock-wise as is the Path of the Sun from the northern vantage point.

    There is the Sun and its Rays. These represent the Clans of the Apsáalooke . They were named by Old Man Coyote and he said the Greasy Mouth Clan is his clan and the Sun is of their Sacred Power. The Sun represents them. The Rays of the Sun represent all of the other Clans.

    You'll see three mountains depicted. They are the three mountains on the present day Crow Reservation-the Wolf Teeth's, the Pryor's and the Big Horn Mountains. They are considered Sacred by the Apsáalooke .

    The two rivers depicted are the Big Big Horn and the Little Big Horn Rivers. They are sacred to the Apsáalooke as they were named by the Seven Sacred Rams.

    There is a Tipi on the emblem and it is white. This is from the Whit Tipi given to Yellow Leggins by White Owl in the Spiritual gifting of the tipi to the Apsáalooke . White Owl told Yellow Leggins the tipi is white because represents purity and good. Nothing evil or bad comes to the home when the tipi is white. The tipi has the foundation structure of the Four Base Poles. They represent the never ending Cycle of the Seasons. The tipi has the two Ventilator Flap Poles. They represent the Spirit of the Coyote on the right, facing eastward, and the Spirit of the Owl on the left. They are the Sentries that watch over the home-the Coyote by the day and the Own at night.

    Later, a Spiritual Being appeared to the Biiluukee wearing a robe that was fastened together with the "sharp" eagle wings. He gave this to secure the home and with it came good fortune.

    The tipi is anchored by stakes imbedded into the ground. These were the Spiritual Gifts from the Badger on the Ground who said the stakes have the strength of his claws when they are imbedded in the ground. Then, no force on Earth can move him from his home. He gave this to the Apsáalooke .

    The tipi is set on Mother Earth which is our Third Mother to which we will eventually return after our time upon Her.

    The Tipi is flanked by the two War Bonnets. One represents the Clan to which we belong. The other represents the Clan of out Fathers. In both Clans, there are Chiefs.

    The Clan of our Fathers is one of the four major beliefs of the Apsáalooke that we revere. The other three are also depicted on the Emblem.

    The closest to the Tipi is the Sweat Lodge, a gift from the Creator since the genesis of the Apsáalooke .

    Next to the Sweat Lodge is the Sacred Tobacco Bundle. This is the defining and foundation religion of the Apsáalooke as it was the Gift from the Creator to No Intestines at the culmination of his Spiritual Vision in which he was told to come to this land, the present day home of the Apsáalooke .

    Next to the Sacred Tobacco Bundle is the Pipe. This is the Spiritual Gift from the Seven Sacred Buffalo Bulls and Buffalo Woman. When the Pipe is lit, the mind is to be filled with good, pure thoughts with peace.

    And at the bottom is the English signifier of the Apsáalooke Nation, CROW TRIBE.

    Source: Crow Tribe Emblem and Flag

  • Small flag of Delaware Tribe of Western Oklahoma
    Flag of Delaware Tribe of Western Oklahoma

    Delaware Tribe of Western Oklahoma, Anadarko, Oklahoma

  • Small flag of Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma
    Flag of Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma

    Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma, Oklahoma

  • Small flag of Eastern Shoshone Tribe
    Flag of Eastern Shoshone Tribe

    Eastern Shoshone Tribe, Fort Washakie, Wyoming

  • Small flag of Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe
    Flag of Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe

    Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe, Flandreau, South Dakota

  • Small flag of Fort Belknap Gros Ventre-Assiniboine Community
    Flag of Fort Belknap Gros Ventre-Assiniboine Community

    Fort Belknap Gros Ventre-Assiniboine Community, Harlem, Montana

    The Great Seal of the Fort Belknap Reservation, Gros Ventre and Assiniboine Tribes. Created by George “Sonny” Shields

    The emblem of the Fort Belknap Reservation’ss Seal, as illustrated by the traditional shield symbolizes the shield’ss protection of the two tribes, the Gros Ventre and Assiniboine. The shield illustrates the protection for the two tribes from the past, present and future, the loss of tribal culture, tribal identity and tribal land base. Individual and tribal interests and future development will also prosper and grow under the shield's protection.

    The circular shape of the shield symbolizes life itself, as perceived by the Indian belief, of the constant cycle of life. Each living thing dependent on each other for life. The killing of the buffalo enables the Indian to live and grow and when his mortal remains return to the Earth, it serves as food for the grasses of the prairie which in turn feeds the buffalo, thus ensuring the constant cycle of life.

    The four directions and the four seasons are symbolized in the use of the four colors: Red-Summer, Yellow-Fall, White-Winter, and Green-Spring.

    Symbolizing the existence of two tribes, the Gros Ventre and Assiniboine on the reservation, who function as a whole, is the buffalo skull. The colors divide it, yet the skull remains as one. The skull has a jagged line from horn to horn representing the Milk River, a major tributary of the Missouri.

    Snake Butte is illustrated above the skull. This butte is a well known landmark for Indian tribes throughout the North. The spring located on the north central part of the butte, is one of the few natural fresh water springs in the area.

    Snake Butte is also the place to seek out visions. Many tried but very few succeeded in acquiring sacred power at this place. The two arrowheads facing each other emphasize the strong traditional ties with the past.

    Seven feathers hang from the shield. When the seal was originated, each feather was for every two of the twelve council members representing the reservations three districts and the center feather representing the Tribal Chairman.

    Source: The Great Seal of the Fort Belknap Reservation

  • Small flag of Fort Peck Assiniboine-Sioux Tribe
    Flag of Fort Peck Assiniboine-Sioux Tribe

    Fort Peck Assiniboine-Sioux Tribe, Poplar, Montana

  • Small flag of Iowa Tribe of Kansas-Nebraska
    Flag of Iowa Tribe of Kansas-Nebraska

    Iowa Tribe of Kansas-Nebraska, White Cloud, Kansas

  • Small flag of Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma
    Flag of Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma

    Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, Perkins, Oklahoma

  • Small flag of Kalispel
    Flag of Kalispel

    Kalispel, Washington

  • Small flag of Kanza Nation
    Flag of Kanza Nation

    Kanza Nation, Kaw City, Oklahoma

  • Small flag of Kickapoo Tribe of Kansas
    Flag of Kickapoo Tribe of Kansas

    Kickapoo Tribe of Kansas, Horton, Kansas

  • Small flag of Kootenai Tribe
    Flag of Kootenai Tribe

    Kootenai Tribe, Bonners Ferry, Idaho

  • Small flag of Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana
    Flag of Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana

    Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, Great Falls, Montana

  • Small flag of Lower Brule Sioux Tribe
    Flag of Lower Brule Sioux Tribe

    Lower Brule Sioux Tribe, Lower Brule, South Dakota

  • Small flag of Monacan Indian Nation
    Flag of Monacan Indian Nation

    Monacan Indian Nation, Amherst County, Virginia

  • Small flag of Nez Perce Tribe
    Flag of Nez Perce Tribe

    Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, Idaho

  • Small flag of Northern Arapaho Tribe
    Flag of Northern Arapaho Tribe

    Northern Arapaho Tribe, Fort Washakie, Wyoming

    The Arapaho Flag was created in 1936 as a sign of respect and remembrance for the Arapaho War Veterans. The three colors used each have a different meaning and symbolism: Red is for the People. Black so the People will be strong and unfearing of death. White represents knowledge to be passed on to the young.

    The seven stripes each represent one of the Seven Medicines of Life. The White triangle signifies the way one begins a prayer. “Hey-so-no-ne-hoe-” “Great Spirit, that's the way I want it.” The circle in the exact center of the triangle is Black on the left, because that's where the heart is. The right side of the circle is Red representing the human side, for our happiness, strength and sorrowful ways. The White line dividing the two spheres represents the Great Spirit so we will not forget who created us. The entire circle represents the world, the center of our lives.

    The Arapaho People approved and adopted the flag in 1956.

    Source: Arapaho.

  • Small flag of Northern Cheyenne Tribe
    Flag of Northern Cheyenne Tribe

    Northern Cheyenne Tribe, Lame Deer, Montana

  • Small flag of Oglala Sioux Tribe
    Flag of Oglala Sioux Tribe

    Oglala Sioux Tribe, Pine Ridge, South Dakota

  • Small flag of Omaha Tribe
    Flag of Omaha Tribe

    Omaha Tribe, Macy, Nebraska

  • Small flag of Osage Nation of Oklahoma
    Flag of Osage Nation of Oklahoma

    Osage Nation of Oklahoma, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

  • Small flag of Otoe-Missouria Tribe
    Flag of Otoe-Missouria Tribe

    Otoe-Missouria Tribe, Red Rock, Oklahoma

  • Small flag of Pawnee Indian Tribe of Oklahoma
    Flag of Pawnee Indian Tribe of Oklahoma

    Pawnee Indian Tribe of Oklahoma, Pawnee, Oklahoma

  • Small flag of Ponca Tribe of Nebraska
    Flag of Ponca Tribe of Nebraska

    Ponca Tribe of Nebraska, Niobara, Nebraska

  • Small flag of Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma
    Flag of Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma

    Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma, Ponca City, Oklahoma

  • Small flag of Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation
    Flag of Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation

    Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Mayetta, Kansas

  • Small flag of Quapaw
    Flag of Quapaw

    Quapaw, Quapaw, Oklahoma

  • Small flag of Quinault Indian Nation
    Flag of Quinault Indian Nation

    Quinault Indian Nation, Taholah, Washington

  • Small flag of Rosebud Sioux Tribe
    Flag of Rosebud Sioux Tribe

    Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Rosebud, South Dakota

  • Small flag of Sac and Fox Tribe of Iowa
    Flag of Sac and Fox Tribe of Iowa

    Sac and Fox Tribe of Iowa, Tama, Iowa

  • Small flag of Sac and Fox Tribe of Missouri
    Flag of Sac and Fox Tribe of Missouri

    Sac and Fox Tribe of Missouri, Reserve, Kansas

  • Small flag of Santee Sioux Tribe
    Flag of Santee Sioux Tribe

    Santee Sioux Tribe, Niobrara, Nebraska

  • Small flag of Shawnee Tribe
    Flag of Shawnee Tribe

    Shawnee Tribe, Miami, Oklahoma

  • Small flag of Shoalwater Bay Tribes
    Flag of Shoalwater Bay Tribes

    Shoalwater Bay Tribes, Tokeland, Washington

  • Small flag of Northern Shoshone & Bannock, and Lemhi Shoshone
    Flag of Northern Shoshone & Bannock, and Lemhi Shoshone

    Northern Shoshone & Bannock, and Lemhi Shoshone, Fort Hall, Idaho

  • Small flag of Siletz
    Flag of Siletz

    Siletz, Siletz, Oregon

  • Small flag of Sisseton-Wahpeton of Lake Traverse
    Flag of Sisseton-Wahpeton of Lake Traverse

    Sisseton-Wahpeton of Lake Traverse, Sisseton, South Dakota

  • Small flag of Spirit Lake Tribe
    Flag of Spirit Lake Tribe

    Spirit Lake Tribe, Fort Totten, North Dakota

  • Small flag of Spokane Tribe
    Flag of Spokane Tribe

    Spokane Tribe, Wellpinit, Washington

  • Small flag of Standing Rock Sioux Tribe
    Flag of Standing Rock Sioux Tribe

    Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Ft. Yates, North Dakota

  • Small flag of Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation
    Flag of Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation

    Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, New Town, North Dakota

  • Small flag of Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa
    Flag of Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa

    Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa, Belcourt, North Dakota

  • Small flag of Wanapum Indian Tribe
    Flag of Wanapum Indian Tribe

    Wanapum Indian Tribe, Pendleton, Oregon; Priest Rapids, Washington

    The Wanapum flag is Smohalla's flag. The blue represents the sky and the star is the North star. Smohalla said “That star never changes; it is always in the same place. I keep my heart on that star; I never change”. The star is a 6-pointed star. The points represent the six days in which to live and prepare for the feast. It is the pulse of life of the universe.

    Sources:
    Relander, Click. Drummers and Dreamers. 1986 Northwest Interpretive Association, Seattle, WA.
    Robert H. Ruby and John A. Brown. Dreamer-Prophets of the Columbia Plateau: Smohalla and Skolaskin. 1989 University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, OK.

  • Small flag of Winnebago Tribe
    Flag of Winnebago Tribe

    Winnebago Tribe, Winnebago, Nebraska

  • Small flag of Yakama Indian Nation
    Flag of Yakama Indian Nation

    Yakama Indian Nation, Toppenish, Washington

  • Small flag of Yankton Sioux Tribe of South Dakota
    Flag of Yankton Sioux Tribe of South Dakota

    Yankton Sioux Tribe of South Dakota, Marty, South Dakota